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Historical Fiction
Six authors bring to life overlapping stories of patricians and slaves, warriors and politicians, villains and heroes who cross each others' path during Pompeii's fiery end.
Caught in the deadly world of the Renaissance's most notorious family, three outsiders must decide if they will flee the dangerous dream of power.
The Borgia family begins its legendary rise, chronicled by an innocent girl who finds herself drawn into their dangerous web.
The lives of an ambitious soldier, a patrician heiress and a future emperor fatefully intersect.
The Year of Four Emperors - and four very different women struggling to survive
A brilliant and paranoid Emperor, a wary and passionate slave girl – who will survive?

Ave Historia: An irreverent look at historical fiction today: books trends, historical tidbits, and random tangents

New Project!

April 18, 2016

Tags: a song of war, the H team, SJA Turney, Vicky Alvear Shecter, Russell Whitfield, Libbie Hawker, Christian Cameron, Stephanie Thornton

I have been LONGING to share this new project, and finally I can: the H Team is back with a fabulous new collaboration. Vicky Alvear Shecter, Simon James Atkinson Turney, Russell Whitfield and I are joined by new team members Christian Cameron, Libbie Hawker, and Stephanie Thornton in a seven-part tale of the Trojan War.

You know the story of the Iliad . . . but not like this.

Expected release date: October 2016

10 Things About Writer Pals

January 8, 2016

Tags: writing advice, C.W. Gortner, Donna Russo Morin, Laura Kaye, Lea Nolan, Christi Barth, Stephanie Dray, Eliza Knight, Ben Kane, Russell Whitfield, SJA Turney, Sophie Perinot, Stephanie Thornton

1. You can name every book they've ever written, describe their fictional heroes and heroines down to eye color and childhood traumas, and know their writing schedule as well as your own—but aren't 100% sure how many children they have. (Laura Kaye—it's two, right? We've only known each other 4 years . . .)

2. You've beta-read so many of each other's rough drafts that your margin notes look like Sanskrit and you have long lost the need to be polite. (Stephanie Thornton's "The Conqueror's Wife," page 337 of the rough draft: “Seriously, another severed head? Does nobody in this book ever bring anything else to a party? Have they never heard of house-plants?!”)

3. Your lunch dates scare the civilians. Because the waiter invariably walks up as one of you is saying brightly “I killed a baby today!” and collecting high-fives and exclamations of “Omigod, so happy for you!” from around the table. Waiter invariably sprints off white-faced before he hears the accompanying “So, this was in Chapter 9 . . .” (Sophie Perinot and I have probably been banned from most of the restaurants in the greater DC metro area.)

4. You're more accustomed to seeing them in some kind of costume or historical rig than out of it. Especially true of the hist-fic pals. If I ever met Ben Kane, Russell Whitfield, or SJA Turney at a conference where they were in normal clothes rather than Roman breastplates and mail, I'd walk right past 'em.

5. You get the emergency call to show up with ice cream and wine for some serious weeping and wailing. But the drama is all over deadlines, not love-lives. (Eliza Knight and I killed a bottle or two as we cried over our collaborative stories in “A Year of Ravens,” and the impossibility that we would ever get them finished in time.)

6. You've had in-depth discussions about everything under the sun, and you each know what the other thinks about life and death, love and work, politics and art, history and pychology. But three years into the friendship you're turning around in amazement and saying “I had no idea you had a sister!”

7. You know each other's writing so well, you can eyeball a crutch phrase from a mile away and hone in on that sucker like a sniper. (Stephanie Dray knows I will carp like a fishwife the moment I see the word “tresses.” Christi Barth beats me over the head about not using enough commas.)

8. Your spouses commiserate over deadline stress. My husband and Lea Nolan's had old home week at the last dinner party. “Yeah, so my wife's curled in the corner gnashing her teeth this week.” “Why, she copyediting?” “Yep, for two more weeks.” “Yeah, that's rough at our house too . . .”

9. They're some of your best friends on earth—and you've met face to face twice. C.W. Gortner and Donna Russo Morin and I only see each other at conferences roughly every other year, but we always fall on each other with cries of joy and proceed to gab more or less nonstop for three days.

10. You have standing dates, not for book clubs or lady lunches or anniversaries, but for book-release days. Writer friends can be counted on to keep you away from the Refresh button on your Amazon Sales Rankings. They WILL use handcuffs if necessary.


Thank God for writer pals. There's no one quite like 'em and without 'em you'd be in the funny farm.