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Historical Fiction
Six authors bring to life overlapping stories of patricians and slaves, warriors and politicians, villains and heroes who cross each others' path during Pompeii's fiery end.
Caught in the deadly world of the Renaissance's most notorious family, three outsiders must decide if they will flee the dangerous dream of power.
The Borgia family begins its legendary rise, chronicled by an innocent girl who finds herself drawn into their dangerous web.
The lives of an ambitious soldier, a patrician heiress and a future emperor fatefully intersect.
The Year of Four Emperors - and four very different women struggling to survive
A brilliant and paranoid Emperor, a wary and passionate slave girl who will survive?

Ave Historia: An irreverent look at historical fiction today: books trends, historical tidbits, and random tangents

Twilight Took Talent

February 5, 2012

Tags: twilight, stephenie meyer, james patterson, j.k. rowling, stephen king, jackie collins

I'm over at "On Fiction Writing" today with a guest post that I suspect may get me egged: an argument that Stephenie Meyer has talent. A snippet:

"Yes, Twi-haters, Stephenie Meyer has talent. So does Jackie Collins. So does James Patterson, and Harold Robbins, and all those writers who pump out terrible sex-and-shopping paperbacks with Fabio and a wind machine on the cover. Having talent is very different, you see, from being a good writer. Stephen King, a fellow who has certainly been accused of publishing dreck in his day, once defined writing talent thus (paraphrased): `If you write a book, if someone buys that book and pays you for it with a check that doesn't bounce, and if you cash that check and use it to pay the light bill, then you have talent.'

For the rest, click here! And stick around to look at the rest of what On Fiction Writing has to offer: a terrific website run by the zaniest group of writers on the planet, who can help you do everything from drafting a query letter to thrashing out your plot problems to ranting about pet peeves in bestsellers.